I'm a writer and journalist from Western Pennsylvania. I've written essays, many about class and culture, for Guernica, Oxford American, and The Rumpus, and my reporting has appeared in the Atlantic, Esquire, Forbes, and Spin. I'm currently at work on No Place for Disgrace, a memoir about love and identity set in the American suburbs. My tumblr is a collection of notes and images — some of my own, and some from others. For a more detailed archive of my work, you can visit my website.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: I spent the morning researching art that was made in response to the September 11 attacks. Thinking about that day reminded me of the story of Dickie Riley, one of the many people who helped build the World Trade Center (and who also helped with clean up in the aftermath of the attacks). His story is one I’ve always wanted to further pursue, if I only had the time.

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On the Legacy of A. Philip Randolph
On this day in September 1967, labor leader and civil rights pioneer A. Philip Randolph was honored during a Labor Day Mass at the Civic Arena, where Bishop John Wright presented him with an award for his outstanding leadership in a distinguished career that spanned more than half a century. Photographer Teenie Harris was in attendance that day, covering the event for the Pittsburgh Courier, when he captured this stark black-and-white image of Randolph being welcomed by a delegation of clergy from the Pittsburgh region and beyond.

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livelymorgue:

Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

    livelymorgue:

    Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

    (via darksilenceinsuburbia)